Is it finished yet?

Is it finished yet?

Is it ever possible to 'complete' an art-work, and should we even want to?The other night I was having a very interesting chat with an artist over on Instagram about creative process and trust (which is one of the core creative mindfulness attitudes) and she brought up the idea of 'completion'. And this idea of completion struck me as very interesting and one that I needed to reflect on and unpack a little. There was something about the idea of working towards completion in the creative process that bugged me a little and I wondered why that was. So I sat down and had a little think, and this is what I thought...

Creative Process: Fumbling at the beginning

Creative Process: Fumbling at the beginning

The start of new projects can often look and feel a little clunky. I'm experimenting wildly and widely at the moment. So many ideas, so many possible pathways for the red threads and the breath. My head is teeming with them! At the moment a lot of my studio practice is simply about exploring those initial ideas, travelling just far enough along the path to see if:

1) the idea, the concept itself will hold my interest

Nurturing a daily creative mindfulness practice

Nurturing a daily creative mindfulness practice

Creating mindfully every day, The wonderful thing about 30 Day Challenges is that they get us motivated, encouraged and determined to practice every day. But what happens when the 30 days are over? Do we: 1) Drop everything instantly and go back to life as normal? 2) Or do we continue to practice daily for a while, and then find ourselves losing momentum and enthusiasm until our practice peters out? 3) Or do we manage - somehow, we're not sure how - to keep it going, most days for ... well, the rest of our lives? I think the second scenario, despite best intentions, is probably the most common - so this blog is all about how to make scenario number 3 more likely to happen.

The art of no expectations

The art of no expectations

At the moment I'm trying to practice the art of no expectations. What's that, I hear you ask? Let me explain. ... You see recently I started a new creative project - the next Stop Look Breathe Create book, in fact. (Woop! I'm very excited.) And I am, as we always are at the beginning of new projects, full of enthusiasm and expectations. This book's been brewing in my head for a long time and inevitably, along with all the sensible and necessary planning (how many chapters, what kind of structure, what practices) there's been a certain amount of rose-tinted daydreaming too. Which is all pretty normal for us human beings, and we mostly recognise these kinds of expectations for what they are, fantasy, but still it's good to be mindful of them.