My interview with Mindful Magazine about drawing and mindfulness

wendy ann greenhalgh

Mindfulness and the art of drawing

“What I discovered was that the practice of mindfulness meditation evoked the same responses from me that drawing did.”

Here is a short exert from the interview...

Like many artists before her, Wendy Ann Greenhalgh finds the process of producing creative work to be a deeply mindful process. Health and well-being journalist Kate Bermingham spoke to Wendy about how artists and mindfulness practitioners can benefit from blending these practices.

Kate: In your book, Mindfulness and the Art of Drawing, you argue that everyone can draw. Is that really true? And if yes, why do you think so few people do it?

Wendy Ann: I know it’s true. All the time people come into my classes saying, “I can’t draw.” A few hours later they emerge with a big sheaf of drawings under their arm. It’s very satisfying to see so many people disproving this notion that they can’t draw on such a regular basis! We draw instinctively as children. As soon as we have motor skills we pick up a stick or crayon and start making marks, marks that feel good, that are pleasing to the eye and the body that creates them. As we get a little older these drawings start to describe the world around us. One of the first “things” anyone draws is a person, for example. So in that sense drawing is innate.

Why don’t we draw? Well I believe the real obstacle is that drawing gets bunched together with a lot of thinking about drawing—like the idea that we have to draw well for example. But what is well, and who decides what it is? Most of us aren’t Usain Bolt, for example, but this doesn’t mean that we can’t run or that we can’t enjoy running.

You can read the whole article here